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What was dating like in the 1940s

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For this reason, the history of dating tends to be quite different for the LGBT population.In the first decade of the twentieth century, men "called upon" young women whom they fancied by (with the permission of her parents) visiting her home.Scarcity was a common theme, and this mindset may have impacted dating life in this decade as well.Competitive dating, or “The Rating and Dating Complex” (by sociologist Willard Waller) dominated youth culture.The two would spend time together, usually with the supervision of her parents so that they may get to know each other on an intellectual and emotional level.The couple was rarely left alone, making sexual intimacy (and physical contact in general) nearly impossible.But, competitive dating was rising, partially due to the financial crises in the 1930s.13-15 million workers lost their jobs at the height of The Great Depression in 1933.

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A lot of people wanted to get married at a younger age in these decades but there were a lot of people who wanted to experience life pre-marriage. I had pretty much given up hope on receiving an answer, so it was a very pleasant surprise to go to my inbox and see such a thorough reply.

ORIGINS OF DATING Dating is definitely an "American phenomenon." Few other countries carry on this practice with as much fervor as Americans do.

Then again, few other countries have the same social conditions as America.

, courtship took place in parlor rooms and under parental supervision before the 1920s. But, once dating went public, along with the proliferation of media (radio, magazines, movies, and books), young people heard from others about what was “in.” , “from the late 1930s on, young people knew, down to the percentage point, what their peers throughout the country thought and did.” Perception and appearance became everything.

As Beth Bailey, author of The concept of dating value had nothing to do with the interpersonal experience of a date–whether or not the boy (or girl, for that matter) was fun or charming or brilliant was irrelevant. Having a “good line” meant the young gentleman had to exhibit passion and personality to gain a girl’s attention.